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Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Today's Special -- Ashley March



We are so happy to welcome back historical author Ashley March! Her latest novel, ROMANCING THE COUNTESS, was released earlier this month on September 6. If you missed Buffie's glowing review, you can check it out here. When Ashley is not chasing around her two daughters, she is crafting her next delicious masterpiece. Give a warm welcome to Ashley March as she talks to us about ....






The Rise of the Prequel

Thanks so much to the ladies at The Romance Dish for having me today! I’m thrilled to be visiting with everyone again, this time to celebrate the release of my newest Victorian historical, ROMANCING THE COUNTESS!

However, my blog today isn’t going to focus on ROMANCING THE COUNTESS; instead, I’m going to focus on the prequel to ROMANCING THE COUNTESS, which is called ROMANCING LADY CECILY.

As we all know, the publishing industry is changing at such a rapid pace it’s difficult to keep up these days. I personally love my e-books. It’s hard sometimes for me to find time to read as a stay-at-home mom and writer who works throughout the evening and into the early morning hours, but I’ve (happily!) found that I’m going through books faster than I ever have because I can now read them on my smart phone. (This means I can take it with my anywhere and don’t have to worry about the baby eating the pages if I put it down.)

Along with the ease of book portability, I’ve noticed something else that’s happened within the past year: the rise of the prequel.

Whereas in the past publishers haven’t really published short stories or novellas unless they were part of a larger anthology, now we’re seeing a trend of short stories and novellas being released digitally as a means of 1) hooking a reader on a new author for a lower price and/or 2) whetting the reader’s appetite for the related full-length novel.

ROMANCING LADY CECILY is an example of such a piece, something which my publisher approached me about writing after I’d already turned in the related novel, ROMANCING THE COUNTESS. At 15,000 words, it is more of a short story than a novella, but as my first shorter work I was thrilled to discover how much fun it was to write. (It’s also a bit spicier than my usual work.)

As a writer, I have to admit that I like this new trend we’re seeing because I always have ideas for characters and stories in my head that are dying to get out. As a reader, I love these shorter pieces because they allow me to read more of my favorite authors in between the publication of their full-length novels. While I know some readers don’t enjoy short stories or novellas because of their length, if I have a favorite author I will greedily get my hands on anything they write.
One of the more interesting things I’ve seen is not only the rise of the prequel, but also the rise of a series of prequels. By series, I specifically mean a group of novellas that are linked together which all act to increase the reader’s anticipation for a longer novel to be released at a later date.

I know there’s a lot of uncertainty out there about what’s going to happen in the future of publishing, but I have to tell you this—as both a reader and writer, the more stories that are written by authors I love, the happier I am.

But I’d most love to hear what you think about the rise of short stories and novellas. Do you stay away from them because of the shorter length or because they’re predominantly digitally published? Or do you gobble them up, excited to find something new from an author you love? Would you try a new-to-you author by buying a short story or novella at a lower price? One random commenter will be chosen to win a copy of my newest book, ROMANCING THE COUNTESS (open internationally)!

Also, find out how to win the ROMANCING THE COUNTESS Book Tour Grand Prize of 50+ romance novels by visiting Ashley's website.




~ Buffie


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ROMANCING LADY CECILY (15,000-word short story)
Follow acclaimed author Ashley March, praised by Booklist for her “elegant writing [and] sizzling sexual chemistry,” into the world of Victorian romance, where Lady Cecily Bishop—promised by her parents to a stranger—must fend off the seductive games and heady caresses of Baron Sedgwick….a task that becomes more difficult with each soul-searing kiss…


ROMANCING THE COUNTESS (full-length novel)
Sebastian Madinger, the Earl of Wriothesly, thought he'd married the perfect woman-until a fatal accident revealed her betrayal with his best friend. After their deaths, Sebastian is determined to avoid a scandal for the sake of his son. But his best friend's widow is just as determined to cast her mourning veil aside by hosting a party that will surely destroy both their reputations and expose all of his carefully kept secrets...
Leah George has carried the painful knowledge of her husband's affair for almost a year. All she wants now is to enjoy her independence and make a new life for herself-even if that means being ostracized by the Society whose rules she was raised to obey. Now that the rumors are flying, there's only one thing left for Sebastian to do: silence the scandal by enticing the improper widow into becoming a proper wife. But when it comes to matters of the heart, neither Sebastian nor Leah is prepared for the passion they discover in each other's arms...



95 comments:

  1. For me a book can't be too long, so short stories or novellas I tend to stay away from. However, if it's a favorite author I read everything they write.

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  2. Ashley, I really enjoyed RTC and have already put you in that "she writes it, I buy it" category. And there's only one thing I enjoy more than a well written romance, and that's a well written romance with some HEAT in it.... any more of these novellas on the way?

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  3. I bought Romancing Lady Cecily on the weekend but I haven't read it yet. I quite like short stories - when it's a new-to-me author, I get a chance to see what they're like without having to spend much money and when it's an author I already love, it's just icing. I think it's hard to write short and get a full story in - it must be such a different experience than writing a full length novel.

    hankts AT internode DOT on DOT net

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  4. Ashley!!! I'm been remiss in leaving you love at all the stops on you EPIC book tour. :( <3u!! Congrats on RtC. It was fabulous. That Sebastian is something else. "I'm not touching you..." *dies*

    When I try a novella, I usually end up buying a full length book from that author or at least put their backlist on my wish list. But hey, I'm one of those cover hos so I will pick up anything with a hot, gorgeous or sexy cover. Bonus points on the stepback or awesome title. lol. :) Anything that fits on a Kindle *pets it lovingly* I'm down with it.

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  6. I like short stories/novellas. They're a great lunchtime fix cos I hate having to put a book down once I've started especially if I'm really enjoying it.

    They're also a great way of checking out a new author before buying their books.

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  7. Hi Ashley, Could you please tell us the difference between Novellas and Short Stories?

    I have loved them ever since they were used to teach us a sampling of American literature in Middle School. I have continued to use them to hone my literary likes and dislikes.
    I got the reader gene from my father who was never without something to read at hand; I learned the value of reading for education as well as for pleasure very young.

    Anyway, I have discovered many of my favorite writers from anthologies of Novellas and Short Stories: Jude Deveraux and Judith McNaught in “Simple Gifts” and “A Holiday of Love”…Connie Brockway and Christina Dodd in “Once Upon a Pillow” This is only a small sample of what I mean, but you should know that I have read each and every one of these author’s works!

    I believe that the use of Novellas and Short Stories in publishing today still makes a great deal of sense whatever the format. However, we are only seeing the tip of the iceberg of the future of digital literature. Can you imagine the publishers and authors’ opportunities yet to come? Offering less costly alternatives to introduce new writers or expand your readership is a win win!

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  8. hoonestly while illread a short for a review or somthing i tend to stear clear other wise i much rather read a print novle I dont have a reader so that maks it difficult to read digital books even if i can on my pc it isnt as cozy and i always want more

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  9. I'm normally hesitant when it comes to reading prequels. Right now I'm on a very tight budget, so I can't afford to spend money on prequels and I'd much prefer to spend them on a story that has an ending.

    But novellas in an anthology are great promotion for new authors, especially if one of the authors in the line-up is really successful.

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  10. Ashley, I think that as long as the story is good, I'll read it! :) I do prefer long stories though because it is usually more satisfying but there are times that I do prefer shorter stories...

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  11. Hi, Ashley, and welcome back to The Dish!

    I enjoy short stories and novellas. They work perfectly for those times when I can't sit down and read a full-length book. Sort of like having a bite or two of cake, instead of the entire piece. Although I like both of those scenarios. LOL

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  12. I enjoy novellas and short stories and will buy them if autobuy authors are in them. I will, also, buy them if I've read an interesting excerpt.
    marlenebreakfield(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  13. I actually love prequels and novellas. Romancing Lady Cecily was the first book I read from you. That made me want to read Seducing the Duchess because I loved your style of writing.
    Also I have to say I love what Lavina Kent did with releasing four novellas before her book at the of the month. Each one is related yet their own story. I think that is a great way of getting people excited about a book without exerpts.

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  14. i don't mind to read a novella or short story because maybe author want us to know about story from the person beside hero/heroine which have a big role but she can't write in one book so she make a novella or other reason. but i love reading it especially from my fav author ^^
    .

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  15. I am not a big fan of short stories or novellas. I prefer a longer story to get a better grasp of a character/situation.

    I've always felt that way, don't know why.

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  16. I don't care for short stories, with the exception of an occasional anthology.

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  17. Ashley, congratulations on your new release! It sounds great, as does the prequel.

    I do buy short stories and novellas. I keep a supply on the iPad for reading in waiting rooms or at times when I don't want to dive into a book (I went through two novellas while waiting for my son to finish his wardrobe fitting as a Hunger Games extra this summer).

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  18. Beebs, I agree that shorter works are a great way to check out new authors.

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  19. Welcome, Ashley, to The Romance Dish! My, you sure are "getting around" these days (shhh, I won't tell your family, LOL)! It's great to see you here (too)!

    Like the others have said, I enjoy short stories, especially as an introduction to new authors, but also as a "quickie fix" when I'm missing my favourite authors' works.

    That being said, I haven't jumped on the digital wagon yet, nor do I know if I will. I keep buying and reading the printed books, which are easy to pass on to my friends when I'm done, so I don't miss what I don't have.

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  20. I like short stories, prequels, novellas and especially anthologies. It's a great way to get acquainted with a new-to-me or debut author and their works.

    I bought RLC and loved it..really primed me up to read RtC...it's on my TBR shelf...it's making it to the top of the heap as we speak! LOL

    Stephanie Laurens did a prequel to her Bar Cynster series and it was published after the 3rd book of that series was already out. Titled 'The Promise in a Kiss', it covers a few generations before the beginning of the first book. It was a little weird coming late to the party as it did, but since the characters of the actual series weren't born yet, it didn't really matter. But it did explain in more detail Sebastian (Devil) Cynster's background and his life influences. So it was all good in the end. For the most part, I prefer the prequel to be just that...out before the 1st book in a series.

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  21. I read anthologies both to get a sence of new authors I have not already read, and to read authors I am already a fan of. Most the time I am picking them up if there is already an author I like in the anthology. I love it when an author puts in a short story from a series I am already reading. Usually with secondary charaters but enough of the series highlight that make you wish it were more.

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  22. I love short stories and novellas. They are great for reading at soccer practice, in the doctor's office, in line at the supermarket, etc. I also think they are excellent for checking out new-to-me authors since the time and $ investment is less. I'm also a fan of the freebie shorts that some of my favorite authors--Eloisa James, Marie Force, Emily March, and others--have given their fans.

    And I love prequels too. I recently read Mary Balogh's The Secret Mistress, a prequel I've been waiting for since I read No Man's Mistress and More Than a Mistress.

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  23. i love to read short stories and novellas, especially during certain times of the year that are hectic. Or, there are times I want a quick and satisfying HEA, so read a novella.

    I do NOT like ebooks or kindles, etc. For one, I don't use credit cards, so uploading a story would not work for me. Secondly, I like holding a book in my hand.

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  24. I usually don't read novellas but if it is from a favorite author I will. I just tend to like longer stories better.

    evjochum[AT]aol[DOT]com

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  25. I loved Ashley's debut novel so can't wait to read this one!

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  26. There are times I really enjoy a good short story when I don't have time to read a lot. A lot of times I will read a longer book then a short story. So yes I would buy a short story to try and new authors work.

    Your books sound fabulos can't wait to read it.

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  27. Deb, I don't like using my credit card online, so I use gift cards with Amazon. If you ever decide you want to take the plunge into e-reading, that might be one way. There are Kindle apps for PC and Mac computers as well as e-readers.

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  28. The longer the better! I'm not a big fan of short stories.

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  29. I like novellas and short stories--both from favorite authors and as an introduction to authors whose work is new to me. Thanks for visiting, Ashley.

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  30. Ashley - you are one busy lady! Thanks for mentioning Lady Cecily's story - I didn't know about that.

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  31. Marybelle, isn't it great to devour everything from one of your favorite authors? I love it!

    LOL, Grace! you are a girl after my own heart. I love the HEAT too ;-)

    Kaetrin, I enjoy reading novellas to find new authors too. And sometimes novellas are just the right size for a quick read during a busy week.

    Hey Kati! I see you are a fellow Sebastian lover ;-)

    Beebs, exactly! Perfect for a little diversion during a lunch break.

    Well said fsbulcher!

    SiNn, I think I will always prefer curling up with a printed book over my ereader, though the ereader has so many advantages (such as carrying loads of great books in one little compact item).

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  32. Antonia, I hear you on things being tight during these difficult financial times. Anthologies are always great because you are getting 3 or 4 stories for the price of one.

    May, I'm with you on that. If the story is good it doesn't matter how long it is.

    Gannon, a bite or two of cake instead of the whole piece? I just don't understand that - LOL!

    mbreakfield, I read all the inserts too!

    Ora, thanks for the information on the Kent books. I need to check those out!

    Eli, I think we would all read anything by our favorite authors. Have you read any of Ashley's work yet? If not, you really should check her out. She's great!

    Susied, there's nothing wrong with that. I feel you get to know the hero/heroine so much more in a long story just because we as the reader get to see them in so many different circumstances.

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  33. niteofblu, do you have a special anthology that you read over and over again? I tend to re-read all the ones I have during the cold winter months.

    Hey Nancy! Yes, these are perfect for the waiting room. How cool that your son was an extra!!! A movie is being filmed about a mile from my office and I pass the signs and trailers every day. Wish I knew what movie it was!

    Laney4, a quickie fix - LOL!! Perfect phrasing!

    Karen, you are going to love RTC!!! :-)

    Rainie72, I can never get enough of secondary characters. I always wonder what happens to them.

    Janga, I wish I could read during soccer practice. My youngest (9) is constantly looking over to see if I'm watching him ;-)

    Deb, I much prefer a printed book. Something about holding it and actually turning the pages. I do have an ereader and think it is going to be great when traveling as I can load lots of books on it and it still fit in my purse.

    Johanna, there is nothing like spending an entire day reading a long book. I wish I had more time to do that.

    Marjana, you are going to love this book!

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  34. Virginia, the book is really good. I hope you pick it up.

    Minna, longer is better - hehehehe! Sorry, my mind went there ;-)

    LSUReader, great to see you here! I love anything by a good writer :-)

    Di, Ashley is one very busy lady. I just don't see how she does it all!!

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  35. I read novellas only rarely because I find myself most often wishing it were a full-length book after finishing it. But I like to try them when they are from a new-to-me author. To see "if the style fits".

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  36. Ashley

    I have just finished reading Seducing The Duchess and loved it I have the short story and the new book on my e reader ready to read and am soo looking forward to it.

    I enjoy the short stories especially if they are related to another book the author has written I have lots of them on my e reader and sometimes they are just the thing to read especially if you have lots going on. I love them, and like trying new authors out this way as well.
    Comgrats Ashley on the release I am looking forward to reading them

    Have Fun
    Helen

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  37. I love prequels but I don't always buy them. I usually will only buy them if they are from an author I usually read, or from part of a book that I've either read or am planning to read.

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  38. After I got a Kindle, I found out that I prefer shorter works on the Kindle (didn't have this problem when I was reading ebooks on my laptop) so I'm glad there are so many short stories/prequels released by my favorite authors, or in some cases, to find new favorite authors.

    I still want novel-length books in paper form though, especially if the cover is drool-worthy.

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  39. Hi Ashley! Welcome back!

    I love novellas and short stories. There are many times when I just don't have the time for a full-length book. Also, as others have mentioned, it's a great way to check out an unfamiliar author at a lower price.

    For me, it doesn't matter if they're in print or digital, especially since I now have my pretty new Nook Color that I got yesterday for my birthday! :)

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  40. Hi, Ashley, and welcome back! I bought Romancing the Countess after I read Buffie's review and can't wait to read it!

    I enjoy novellas and short stories. Typically, I'll buy an anthology because of one or two authors and get to "try out" a new author, too. I don't own an e-reader, so I usually only buy print books. What can I say? I'm old-fashioned! :)

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  41. A Nook Color! What a terrific birthday present, PJ. I hope you love it.

    I have always been and still prefer to read books in paper better than in a digital format. However, I,too, got a Nook Color last month. I'm glad I did, espicially for travel and downloading books only available digitally.

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  42. I enjoy short stories, especially in anthologies. They give me a chance to try out new authors and revisit old favorites. I've read a lot of short stories that were posted on authors blogs and then went on to buy their books, but I haven't spent much money on just buying short stories.

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  43. I have read some really good novellas. However, I tend to shy away from them because the majority of the ones I have read seemed to be rushed. It could be because of the length of the book but I think it takes talent to start a story, have a really great plot, and wrap it up quickly without making the reader feel like you are rushing the end. Sadly, even some of my favorite authors who have written novellas have committed the ultimate sin: rushing the end.

    My preference is a full length novel. That way I can savor the world building, the plot, the characters, etc.

    kamwh1207(at)att(dot)net

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  44. Hi Everyone! I think I'm going to have to plan a book tour next time called "Why Not to Have Children." Just kidding. =) Man, I'm so glad to be hanging out with adults now--today was rough! Yay for romance! =)

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  45. Hi Marybelle! Then I bet you miss the romances of old. Some of them were what--120,000? 150,000? I wonder if we'll start to see a trend in the future with longer digital books that are being self-published.

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  46. Hi Grace! Thank you so much--I'm so glad you enjoyed it. =D Ah, the heat. Well, as a matter of fact, I am planning some more novellas with heat in them. =) And now that I know how much people like them, will have to consider doing more. =)

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  47. Hi Kaetrin! First of all, thanks so much for buying RLC--I hope you enjoy it! Yes, it was a much different experience, especially since I'd never done it before. I kept worrying that readers would be unsatisfied when they finished the story. Thankfully, that hasn't been the case yet. And although I intend to write more short stories and novellas in the future, my preference for writing will probably always stay with the longer novels. I have more wriggle room that way. =)

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  48. Hi Kati! Thanks so much for commenting--I'm always grateful for your support! =) Since you say that you adore covers and the Kindle, I have to know your opinion on browsing through books on the Kindle. For me, I wish the covers came up all the time and I wish they were in color. In my opinion, part of the pleasure of reading is viewing the cover associated with the content.

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  49. Hi Beebs! Thanks for this comment. I know I tend to read in short spurts now that I have two daughters (oh, how I miss the days when I could just read from morning to evening), and I agree that shorter stories tend to help with the full romance fix. =)

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  50. Hi fsbuchler! I can only tell you what I understand the difference to be in publishing terms (word count). From my understanding, short stories are up to 20,000 words, and novellas are between 20,000 and 40,000 words. No matter the length, every story should always have a fully developed character arc and leave the reader satisfied. Both of these are hard to do in novellas, and even harder to accomplish in short stories.

    I'm so glad to hear you use novellas as a means of finding new authors (and it looks like you've found some great ones!). And you're right--who knows what we'll have next in the publishing world? I just know that as a reader and as a writer it's interesting to see what's coming next. =)

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  51. Hi SiNn! I'm so glad you commented. I know that was dead set against e-readers (mainly wanted to support bookstores) until the day I went to my local bookstore (30 minutes away, AFTER getting the kids in the car) and found that not only did they not have one book I wanted, they didn't have THREE books I wanted. That day I told my husband I wanted an e-reader for my birthday, and I haven't look back since. I really enjoy reading on my Kindle and on my phone, and find that I enjoy shorter works much more now than I did in print. It's interesting that the reading experience is so different depending on what format you use.

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  52. Hi Antonia! Hmm. This brings up a good point. In actuality, ROMANCING LADY CECILY has a satisfying ending for the couple in the short story. By prequel, I meant that the story serves as an introduction to the world of ROMANCING THE COUNTESS, the longer full-length novel.

    I've heard of short stories acting as true prequels in that they don't have a true ending, and I honestly can't see the point of spending my money, either. It feels like a gimmick to me to just make money, and I don't like that, either as a writer or a reader.

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  53. Hi May! Thanks for your comment! What you said about wanting more made me think of the fact that Julia Quinn wrote 2nd Epilogues for her Bridgerton series. I think if readers love a couple, they don't ever want to move on, whether the original story is a novella or full-length novel. Interesting point. =)

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  54. Lol Gannon. I was wondering where you were going with that cake analogy. Because I know I wouldn't want to stop at two bites, either. ;) But I agree with what you're saying--perhaps, for most readers, both types of stories can be appreciated, and it just matters what a reader is in the mood for.

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  55. Hi mbreakfield! =) I definitely agree about the excerpt. I think this is probably one of the main reasons why I love my e-reader--the samples. I have found some great books I would never have bought by reading samples first, and have avoided some awful books I probably would have bought otherwise.

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  56. Hi Ora! Oh, I'm so glad you liked ROMANCING LADY CECILY then. =) Interesting--I'll have to check out Lavinia Kent's website. I didn't realize she didn't put any excerpt out for her full-length book. And I've also heard great things about these shorter novellas of hers, although I do have to wonder if the similarity to the Real Housewives TV show makes a reader who doesn't watch that show enjoy the novellas less. Knowing Lavinia Kent, though, probably not. =)

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  57. Hi Eli! This is a really great point--sometimes a character just doesn't have a full-length novel in them. I've run into a few of those characters while I've written full-length novels, and it's true that while they were great secondary characters and would make for interesting heroes/heroines in their own short story or novella, I just don't think they were "big" enough to carry their own novel.

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  58. Hi susied! Thanks for your comment. =) I have to admit I always felt the same way as a print reader. Especially when that meant I had to shell out $7.99 for an anthology. As a digital reader now, though, I find that I'm much more willing to buy a novella or anthology containing novellas if I'm happy about the price. I think it's both reading format and price point now.

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  59. Hi niteofblu! I used to be the same way. =) I think the only anthologies I used to buy in print were anthologies featuring either Julia Quinn or Lisa Kleypas. I am glad that digital content makes it easier and cheaper to try the shorter stories, and find it interesting how my reading "personality" has changed accordingly.

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  60. Hi Nancy! Okay, first of all, that's really cool that your son was able to be an extra. But I'm sure you hear that all the time. =) Ah, I know what you mean about not wanting to "commit" to a larger book sometimes, especially when you know that it will take you a long time to finish it. I like to read books quickly so I don't forget anything (and because I'm usually impatient to see what happens next), and novellas really do help with this.

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  61. Hi Laney4! Yes, it will be our little secret. ;) And it's great seeing you again, too! =) Oh, I was totally there. I felt no need to jump on the digital bandwagon UNTIL my local bookstore failed to start carrying the books they should have had. With that being said, I sure did buy a lot of discounted books at Borders...although the store closing is sad in and of itself. =( To me a shopping trip just doesn't feel complete unless I visit a bookstore.

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  62. Hi Karen! So glad you enjoyed RLC...and am crossing my fingers for RtC. ;) Strange about the Stephanie Laurens story... I too think if it's supposed to be a prequel (specifically, when the timeline comes ahead of other books), then it should be published ahead of other books. But I love reading stories that keep me in the same world as a series I love. Can't complain there. =)

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  63. Hi rainie72! Oh, this is exactly what I've done in the past with print anthologies--buy them because one of the authors is a favorite of mine. And isn't it such a treat when you end up loving another author in the anthology that's new to you? I like going in with low expectations so I can be surprised, lol. ;)

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  64. Hi Janga! This is a fantastic point about short stories/novellas and trying new authors. We tend to focus (or at least I do) on price point for shorter works, but the time investment is just as important/if not more important when we have such busy lives. And it's true that while a digital sample can help us decide to try a book, we all know that a good beginning doesn't always mean a good middle or a good end. Thanks for the ocmment! =)

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  65. Hi Deb! Thanks so much for your input as a print reader! I know one of the things I've thought about for future e-books is whether or not print readers would be happy to just order a print-on-demand (POD) copy of the book from an online retailer, but I wasn't thinking about people who don't use credit/debit cards online. Thank you for reminding me of this. =)

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  66. Agreed, Johanna. =) If it's a favorite author or a new author I will read a novella, but longer stories are always preferred.

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  67. Oh, thank you, marjana! Hope you enjoy it just as much! =)

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  68. Hi Virginia! I think you and I are similar types of readers. =) And thank you! If you get a chance to read it, I hope you enjoy! =)

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  69. Hi Nancy--great idea on the gift cards. I'll have to remember this for future gifts and giveaways. =)

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  70. Hi Minna! Thanks so much for your input! =) It's still my preference, too.

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  71. Hi LSUReader! Thanks for letting me know. =) I think I'm going to tabulate all the comments and see later where we are on who prefers what. For scientific reasons, of course. ;)

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  72. Hi Di! =D Busy, but having fun. I keep repeating that to myself, lol. (Luckily it's true.) And you're welcome! Happy to spread the information, especially since I really am interested in knowing what people think about shorter works. Thanks for visiting again with me today. =)

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  73. Hi Buffie! =) Again, I'm really thrilled that you loved RtC, and thanks again for hosting me with the other ladies today! I recently discovered that I can read my ebooks on my phone (I'm a little slow, I know), and it's SO HARD not to read when I'm SUPPOSED to be doing other things...like hanging out with the family. I know exactly what you mean about the soccer practice. =)

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  74. Hi ClaudiaGC! I think this makes a lot of sense. Any money and time spent is an investment, and unless you are confident you'll be satisfied with the story in the end, it's hard to commit to something. This is why novellas are good for me when I don't want to spend a lot of money on trying new authors.

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  75. Oh, thank you, Helen! So glad you enjoyed SD. =) And thank you for buying RtC and RLC as well! I hope they, too, meet your expectations. =) And you make a great point. I personally think I would be more inclined to read a novella if I knew the characters were related to another work, not just a stand-alone.

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  76. Hi Danielle! I'm very honored to know you read RLC even more now. =) Thank you!

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  77. Hi Sheree! This is very interesting! I'm the same way in that I like reading shorter stories a whole lot more on my Kindle than I ever did in print, but I have to admit that I'm pretty much an e-book convert, too. Now prefer to read e-book over print no matter the length, although I never thought that would happen.

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  78. Ooohh...I didn't know about the new Nook! How exciting, PJ! I know my hubby is currently lusting after one of those. =) And thanks so much for having me again!

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  79. Hi Andrea! Thanks so much, and thanks also for buying RtC! I really hope you enjoy it. =) I'm curious, since you say that you only buy print books (I was the same way only 5 months ago), would you ever be willing to buy Print-on-Demand books if you wanted a book that an author self-published digitally?

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  80. Fsbuchler--we didn't even discuss the convenience part of an e-reader, did we? Maybe that's why I'm hooked. So many books at my fingertips, and so easy to carry around. =)

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  81. Thanks so much for your comment, Barbara--this was very interesting, specifically your mention of reading free short stories on an author's website. I'll have to think about this. =)

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  82. Hi Tina! =) I think you are absolutely correct on this, specifically the rushing of an ending. It's so difficult to get right. Honestly, any ending is hard to get right, even with novels, and it's even harder with a novella. In my mind, if a reader isn't satisfied with an ending, then I should have worked harder. Hopefully that doesn't happen, though. =)

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  83. She has put a few, however for What a Duke Wants she hasn't, just the novellas.

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  84. I usually read full length stories but sometimes I do like the short length of a novella and the chance to find a good author for a small price.

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  85. I have always loved anthologies. I have one whole bookshelf double stacked with them. i always have a book with me. It is much easier to keep a shorter work straight when reading it in bits and pieces. I hesitate to start a full length book when I know I will be running errands or have appointments. Short stories and novellas are perfect for those days. I may buy them for a favorite author or two included in the book, but have discovered many new authors this way. I also like to reread favorite stories which is much easier to do when they are short.
    I have found many good short stories and anthologies coming out in e-form. Unfortunately, I do not yet have an e-reader. Soon I hope. I am missing some good reading.

    No need to enter me in the drawing, I won on an earlier blog. I am looking forward to reading Sebastian and Leah's story.

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  86. For me I really enjoy trying an authors work through a short story for one, the price hooks me and then I like to see if the author can deliver a satisfying story through the shorter length. Then if I do like it, I buy more of their books so its def a good idea for me :) I read all of Lavina Kents novellas and as a result, bought all of her books b/c she did a great job with each story (thankfully for my budget the backlist was just three book lol)

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  87. Ashley March is a very talented author. I agree that some books seem to drag on, however, if the plot is good and the story covers a fairly long period of time, then the longer length is certainly justified. I am adding these books to my Wish List.

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  88. I actually don't like short stories or novellas because they are just wait to short and I feel like the story never fully develops

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  89. Thanks, Ora. I wonder if this is a deliberate omission or just something that she hasn't done yet. Hmm. =)

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  90. Thanks for commenting, Maureen! I really do appreciate hearing everyone's opinion on this--I think it's fascinating to see the habits of different readers. =)

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  91. Hi librarypat! Thanks so much for dropping by. =) I love the image I get in my head of so many books on bookshelves. =) I think that it would be wise of digital authors to package novellas together so that they can be printed as anthologies for print readers. I hope to do this one day, too. =)

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  92. Hi Lisa! I think this is such a win-win situation for readers and writers. I've been there, too, where reading ONE story made me want to glom that author's backlist. And I have. Really need to check out these Lavinia Kent novellas. =)

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  93. Hi Connie! Thank you so much for the wonderful comment. =) I'm so thrilled you enjoy my writing! And I know exactly what you mean...if the story and the characters are good, I'd much rather it be longer so I can leave their world fully satisfied than get stuck with something too short.

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  94. Hi marjana--that's one of my concerns, too. Thanks for bringing this up!

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  95. Wow, I love the cover of this book! Her blue dress is just gorgeous. I prefer full-length novels rather than novellas, although sometimes I choose a short story & finish it in 1 hour. Mostly I do that if I don't have enough free & I don't want to leave it unfinished.

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