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Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Today's Special - - Megan Frampton Blog Tour Review & Giveaway




Why Do Dukes Fall in Love?
By Megan Frampton
Publisher: Avon
Release Date: July 26, 2016


 

Michael, the Duke of Hadlow, is in need of a secretary—one, he hopes (but isn’t particularly optimistic) this time will not be a complete moron. After interviewing a number of candidates—each dumber than the one before—he meets the perfect secretary: Mrs. Edwina Chetlam. Hadlow isn’t one to allow emotions (“I can’t hire a woman”) to get in the way of logic. Logically, Mrs. Chetlam is everything he desires in a secretary: competent, efficient, courageous, and seemingly able to read his mind. It’s amazing to meet someone who actually doesn’t cower whenever he expresses his frustration but takes him in stride and when necessary, stands up to him. Most importantly, she’s the only one capable to actually do the job.

It’s only natural when their mutual attraction for each other grows and they embark on a passionate affair that only blazes higher instead of fade out (as he expects), and when he decides he needs to take a bride, he soon discovers that instead of marrying a proper woman within his own class, as his secretary advises, he only wants Chetlam. But as a man who has difficulty expressing any emotion other than anger, Hadlow learns the hard way that what he feels for Chetlam is more than just friendship or an ability to rub along together. No, what he feels is no less than true love, but is it too late to get Chetlam to change her mind about marrying him?

Ah, but if there’s anything dukes are especially good at (besides their way around the bedroom), it’s getting what they want.

Normally I’m not a fan of the Boss and the Servant Trope, but I think Ms. Frampton did an excellent job of making the hero and heroine seem very equal. It was always clear Hadlow respected Chetlam (in fact that’s what he always called her, which I adored) and valued her intelligence; and the fact he’s so bad with people in general and she’s his buffer to the rest of the world puts them as partners rather than master and supplicant.

Their banter is hilarious and their conversations always add to the story, growing them both as characters. It was a joy watching Hadlow grow into a more empathetic person; and Chetlam grows in her daring and boldness, which leads to even funnier and more poignant scenes. The running joke about a piece of railroad engine compared to the duke never gets old. A very charming romance. 

~Hellie



a Rafflecopter giveaway

Megan Frampton writes historical romance under her own name and romantic women’s fiction as Megan Caldwell. She likes the color black, gin, dark-haired British men, and huge earrings, not in that order. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband and son. You can visit her website at www.meganframpton.com. She tweets as @meganf, and is at facebook.com/meganframptonbooks

Avon 


21 comments:

  1. It will be refreshing to read a book where the woman is appreciated for her abilities and capability in a role that was traditionally filled by a male. It sounds like Megan Frampton has given us two strong and slightly out of the ordinary characters. That she seems to have thrown in a fair share of humor is all the better.

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    1. Exactly. It was refreshing, especially in the way that it wasn't a constant uphill battle of the heroine having to prove her worth in this unlikely role, but that he accepted it and respected it. :)

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  2. It will be refreshing to read a book where the woman is appreciated for her abilities and capability in a role that was traditionally filled by a male. It sounds like Megan Frampton has given us two strong and slightly out of the ordinary characters. That she seems to have thrown in a fair share of humor is all the better.

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  3. I love Megan Frampton's novels and have been so looking forward to reading her latest one.

    I like the boss and servant trope. I find the banter is usually veiled and more humorous than some of the snippy and hurtful banter between a hero and heroine we sometimes see.

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    1. Their banter is spot on! It was a joy to watch them on the page. :)

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  4. Sounds like something I would enjoy - thanks.

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    1. I hope so. I think it's definitely worth putting on your TBR pile. :)

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    1. Me, too! My favorite part of romances...well, you know aside from the exquisite sexual tension. :)

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  6. Another great read from Megan Frampton. I don't have twitter but it's going on my TRL.
    Carol L
    Lucky4750 (at) aol (dot) com

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  7. Megan is a new author for me. Sounds really good!

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    1. Megan was a new read for me as well and I was very pleasantly surprised. I plan to seek out her other books. :)

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  8. New author for me. I love good banter in a book. It tells me the author has taken the time to develop the characters.

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    1. I agree, I think sparkling banter shows chemistry--and thus shows the skillful development of the characters. :)

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  9. I'm a Frampton fan, and I have loved all the Dukes Behaving Badly books.

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  10. I just purchased Why Do Dukes Fall in Love? I know I will love the book.

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  11. I am looking forward to reading this! I own & read all of Megan's other books, so not entering the contest. I find the romance and the humor are in just the right proportion, and the characters are always interesting! Also, Megan came to my book club & spoke in January! Thanks for the review, Hellie!

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  12. I have 2 of her Duke's Behaving Badly books, Hellie. I really enjoyed PUT UP YOUR DUKE, so I'll have to research the whole series and catch up!

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  13. Great review! You hooked me when you mentioned the hilarious banter.

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  14. Sounds very good thanks for the review,
    Penney

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