Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Historical Hookup Blog Tour




We're delighted to welcome the Forever "Get Hooked on Historicals" blog tour to the Romance Dish today.  This tour celebrates new books from historical romance authors Elizabeth Hoyt, Eileen Dreyer, Jennifer Delamere, Anne Barton and Lily Dalton.  Research is an intrinsic part of writing a good historical romance and good research usually helps me learn something while reading that romance.  What, we wondered, have the creative minds behind those books learned from their research? Read on to discover the most interesting thing each of our five authors has learned from researching.


“What is the most interesting thing you learned from researching?”

Elizabeth Hoyt, DUKE OF MIDNIGHT:

Ha! Lots. Recently I learned that actresses in the Georgian period didn't have nearly the bad rep as they did later—most were professional women without "protectors." Also, there were a lot of women playwrights.


WHEN A MASKED MAN . . .

Twenty years ago Maximus Batten witnessed the brutal murders of his parents. Now the autocratic Duke of Wakefield, he spends his days ruling Parliament. But by night, disguised as the Ghost of St. Giles, he prowls the grim alleys of St. Giles, ever on the hunt for the murderer. One night he finds a fiery woman who meets him toe-to-toe-and won't back down . . . 

MEETS HIS MATCH . . .

Artemis Greaves toils as a lady's companion, but hiding beneath the plain brown serge of her dress is the heart of a huntress. When the Ghost of St. Giles rescues her from footpads, she recognizes a kindred spirit-and is intrigued. She's even more intrigued when she realizes who exactly the notorious Ghost is by day . . . 

DESIRE IGNITES A DANGEROUS PASSION

Artemis makes a bold move: she demands that Maximus use his influence to free her imprisoned brother-or she will expose him as the Ghost. But blackmailing a powerful duke isn't without risks. Now that she has the tiger by the tail, can she withstand his ire-or the temptation of his embrace?

The author of the New York Times bestselling Maiden Lane series and the Legend of Four Soldiers series as well as the Prince Trilogy, Elizabeth Hoyt writes "mesmerizing" (Publishers Weekly) historical romances. She also pens deliciously fun contemporary romances under the name Julia Harper. Elizabeth lives in central Illinois with three untrained dogs, two angelic but bickering children, and one long-suffering husband. Central Illinois can be less than exciting, and Elizabeth is always more than happy to receive missives from her readers. You can write to her at: P.O. Box 17134, Urbana, IL 61873 and connect with her online at Facebook and Twitter.




Eileen Dreyer, ONCE A RAKE:

Oh, that's a tough one. I've learned so much. I think that for this trilogy it is that the Regency period was a true Renaissance period for amateur scientists, and that those scientists made amazing discoveries. Men and women of leisure made break-throughs in every science from astronomy to chemistry to physics to paleontology. For instance, there was a sixteen-year-old girl named Mary Anning who lived in Lyme Regis (and makes a cameo in ONCE A RAKE) during that era, who discovered the first entire, intact dinosaur skeleton. Not only did Mary, an uneducated girl, make some of the most dramatic contributions to the new science of paleantology, she opened the door through which Darwin walked, and challenged her contemporaries' belief in God (if God was infallible, how could there be evidence of an animal that no longer walked the earth. How could God make a mistake?).



All he wants is her help . . .Colonel Ian Ferguson may be a rake, but he's no traitor. Accused of trying to kill the Duke of Wellington, the disgraced Scotsman is now a fugitive-from the law, the army, and the cunning assassin who hunts him. Wounded and miles from his allies, Ian finds himself at the mercy of an impoverished country wife. The spirited woman is achingly beautiful . . . and hiding some dangerous secrets of her own.

All she needs is his heart . . . 

She was a child nobody wanted. Now for Lady Sarah Clarke, holding on to her vanished husband's crumbling estate is her final chance to earn respectability. She knows that hiding the devastatingly handsome Ferguson will jeopardize her home. Common sense demands that she turn him in. But a single, delirious kiss shatters her resolve . . . and awakens a passion that neither of them can escape.



New York Times best-selling author Eileen Dreyer has won five RITA Awards from the Romance Writers of America, which secures her  fourth place in the Romance Writers of America prestigious Hall of Fame. Eileen is an addicted traveler, having sung in some of the best Irish pubs in the world.  Eileen also writes as Kathleen Korbel and has over three million books in print worldwide. Born and raised in Missouri, she lives in St. Louis County with her husband Rick and her two children. Connect with Eileen online at Facebook and Twitter.


Jennifer Delamere, A LADY MOST LOVELY:

When doing research for A Lady Most Lovely, I came across an amazing tidbit about a shipwreck off the southern coast of Australia. A racehorse aboard that ship survived by swimming seven miles to the shore. That’s how the story of Tom Poole and his stallion was born.



A Heart of Gold

Socialite Margaret Vaughn is the wealthiest heiress in London-or so everybody thinks. Saddled with debt left by her father, she agrees to marry a rich man who can save her family's estate. But when her fiancé turns out to be just another poor social climber, Margaret faces financial ruin-and social humiliation. Just when she thinks all is lost, she finds an unlikely angel in Tom Poole . . . 

After amassing a fortune in the gold fields of Australia and surviving a harrowing shipwreck, Tom Poole is the toast of London society. Yet despite his newfound fame, he's never forgotten his own humble beginnings. When he learns of Margaret's plight, he offers her financial assistance-but his interest is not strictly business. Taken with her beauty and grace, the rugged adventurer wants nothing more than to win Margaret's heart. But can he convince the proper, refined lady that, despite their social differences, they are a match made in heaven?



The youngest child of a Navy pilot and a journalist, Jennifer acquired a love of adventure and an excitement for learning that continues to this day. She's lived in three countries and traveled throughout the U.S. An avid reader of classics and historical fiction, she also enjoys biographies and histories, which she mines for the vivid details to bring to life the characters and places in her books. She resides with her husband in North Carolina--where, when not writing or dreaming up romantic adventures for her characters, she can be found fantasizing about her next ski trip or European vacation.  Connect with Jennifer online at Facebook and Twitter.  


Anne Barton, ONCE SHE WAS TEMPTED:

The Portrait of Madame Recamier (1802) served as inspiration for my heroine’s scandalous portraits. Though the beautiful young woman in the painting, Juliette, was known for being kind and affectionate, she didn’t get her own happily-ever-after. Married at the age of fifteen to a man thirty years older—and who apparently had an attachment to her mother—Juliette was still a virgin at the age of forty. At least the style of sofa that she liked to recline and pose on was named after her—the recamier.



A PORTRAIT OF A LADY. . . or is it? The risqué painting owned by Benjamin Elliot, the earl of Foxburn, features a stunning beauty with sapphire eyes, golden hair, and creamy skin. Ben recognizes this particular English rose the instant he meets her-though she's wearing considerably more clothing. In person, the demure debutante is even more irresistible . . . 

In desperate need of money for her sick mother, Daphne Honeycote had posed for two scandalous portraits. Now she must hide her secret to save the Honeycote family name. Ben's possession of one painting makes him an insufferable thorn in her side-and yet he may be her best chance at finding the canvas's companion. As she becomes drawn to the dark-tempered earl, can Daphne risk laying bare the secrets of her heart?





Anne Barton began swiping romance novels off her mom's bookshelf as a teenager, so when she had the chance to spend a semester in London-home to her favorite heroes-she packed her bags and promptly fell in love with the city, its history, and its pubs. She dreamed of writing romance, but somehow ended up a software analyst instead.

Fortunately, a few years and a few careers later, Anne found her way back to writing the stories she loves and in 2011 won the Romance Writers of America's Golden Heart® for Regency Historical Romance. She lives in Maryland with her husband (who, sadly, is not a peer of the realm-but a great guy nonetheless) and her three children, who try valiantly not to roll their eyes whenever she quotes Jane Austen. Her weaknesses include reality TV, cute-but-impractical shoes, and caffeinated beverages of all kinds. Connect with Anne online at Facebook and Twitter.  


Lily Dalton, NEVER DESIRE A DUKE:

I enjoyed researching Regency Christmas traditions for Never Desire a Duke. Christmas, in that time period, was much more low key than what we celebrate now. Instead of putting up gobs of decorations, and spending too much money on gifts, and being subjected to in-your-face marketing at every turn, a Regency Christmas usually meant a gathering of family and friends for a time spent together and a nicer than usual meal. Those celebrating might attend a church service, or undertake to do some sort of charity for those less fortunate. There were traditions like mistletoe and the kissing bough, and waits (or carolers) might come around and offer a song. All in all, I really liked the simplicity of Christmas in those days and that it was more focused on people than “stuff”.


A Marriage Beyond Hope

Lady Sophia has long been estranged from her husband, Vane Barwick, the Duke of Claxton, whose rumored list of amorous conquests includes almost every beautiful woman of the ton. Yet a shocking encounter with him in a crowded ballroom-and a single touch-are all it takes to reawaken her furious passion for him. But how can she trust the man who crushed her dreams and took away the one thing she wanted most?

A Love Beyond Reason

Claxton has never forgiven himself for the youthful mistake that ruined his marriage to Sophia. Now, after nearly a year abroad, the reformed rogue vows to win back the only woman he's ever truly loved. He'll do whatever it takes to prove he can be the honorable husband she deserves-and the passionate lover she desires. As the snowdrifts deepen outside their ancestral home, can they rekindle the flame that burned so bright and find a new path to forever?


Lily Dalton grew up as an Army brat, moving from place to place. Her first stop after relocating was always the local library, where she could hang out with familiar friends: Books! Lily has an English degree from Texas A & M University and after graduation worked as a legal assistant in the fields of accident reconstruction and litigation. She now lives in Houston, Texas, with her family. When she isn't at work on her next manuscript, she spends her time trying out new recipes, cheering on her favorite Texas football teams and collecting old dishes, vintage linens and other fine "junque" from thrift stores and flea markets.  Connect online with Lily at Facebook and Twitter.  

Readers, tell us about some of the most interesting things you've learned from reading historical romances.  One randomly chosen person leaving a comment on this blog before Friday, October 18th (Midnight EST) will receive all five of the books shown above, courtesy of Forever Romance.  


50 comments:

  1. One of the things I learned were the ranks in the aristocracy and how they're addressed, but one of the more interesting things learned were the types of birth control available during those times like French letters.

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    1. but one of the more interesting things learned were the types of birth control available during those times like French letters.

      I was fascinated by that too, Jane.

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  2. I am always interested in the clothing of the time period.

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    1. I have many friends who feel the same, Sharlene.

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  3. That love conquers all. Makes you believe in Happily ever after.

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  4. I learn things from all the books I read and especially historicals - from forms of titles, dress, historical events, the classes, etiquette and so much more. The last book I read told about how horse racing - all very fascinating.

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    1. I've probably learned more from historical romances than I did in history class! *grin*

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  5. I love learning about what happens above & below stairs. The interaction between the classes. I'd like to see even more of this.

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    1. I think that's fascinating, Mary. Downton Abbey has taught me a lot about above and below stairs.

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  6. I've learned that I know some answers to Jeopardy questions that even my husband didn't know and he knows a lot of history.

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    1. Me too! I love when somebody says, "how did you know that?" and I tell them I learned it in a romance novel. :)

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  7. I've learned so much from historical novels. They can bring history to life in much the same way as visiting a famous castle or palace. Recently I visited Sudeley castle in England where Catherine Parr (Henry VIII last wife) died after giving birth. After seeing some of her costumes on display, it was a delight to read Elizabeth Fremantle's book 'Queen's Gambit' about Parr's affair and eventual disastrous marriage to Thomas Seymore.

    Some of the more gruesome aspects of women being sent to the tower were revealed. In particular the appalling treatment of the protestant martyr Anne Askew (broken on the rack before burning at the stake)

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    1. I love visiting places in person that I've already "visited" in the pages of a book. One of these days I will make it to England!

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  8. Just what I need, PJ--more books to add to my TBR. I just finished writing an enthusiastic review of Once a Rake, and Duke of Midnight is preordered. I'll definitely be checking out the others.

    When I taught Austen, Wharton, and Henry James, it was the world building of romance authors that helped me make the fictional worlds of those authors come alive for my students. For example, all those Regencies gave me a far better understanding of the importance of a maiden's reputation and the effects of primogeniture than the history books ever did.

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    1. LOL @ Janga! I know! Thank goodness for my Kindle or there would be no room left in my condo for me!

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  9. I wuld love to try some of these authors. I read mostly contemps but there is more to learn about the past by reading historicals because, hey they are set in the past. LOL. I really learn how much women were not equals, but they still have the romance and desire that contemp heroines have.

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  10. I have learned even more about the huge differences between the “haves” and the “have-nots” through historical novels. Being raised in the equality we have today, sometimes I think we tend to forget that it wasn’t always that way.

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  11. I learned about the privileged and the hard working, about the landowners and their inheritance.

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  12. The strength of character which was necessary in order to survive for the lower classes. The educated and the wealthy who had so much but lived frivolous and wasted lives.

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  13. Woohoo!! *rubs hands together* I can't wait to get to the bookstore!

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  14. mores of the time which sometimes conflicted each other

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  15. I am all about the clocked stockings! Seems like they figure prominently in several author's books.

    Mary D.

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  16. Like most everyone else, I have learned about aspects of history that can never come "alive" in texts or history books. I love reading about the every day lives of characters, whether they are of the upper or middle or lower crusts of society. One thing I remember about medievals is that to sit below the salt was not a good thing. ;)

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  17. I've learned that love means everything and they stick it out no matter what! They work together it get a job done, which makes their love stronger. You seldom heard of divorce, unlike today it's done daily. No marriage is without obstacles, most just need to look thru the others eyes instead of just thinking of themselves.

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  18. The differences in language usage, fashion and food choices, and holiday customs are among the most interesting learnings for me from historical romances. I really enjoyed today's post. I'm afraid if I ever tried doing this type of research for a book, I'd get lost (happily) in all those facts! Thanks for a great giveaway.

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  19. One of the things that I've learned and loved the most while reading historical romance is getting to know the cities, towns and villages where my ancestors lived! Our family has been sharing a verbal history down through the years but to read about some of the conflicts and victories they were involved in really made me realize the sacrifices my ancestors made over the centuries. "Visiting" their hometowns really made a reality out of the stories that I had heard back to my childhood.

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  20. I've learner a lot of British phrases and I learned that Lord Byron's daughter, Ada Lovelace, is known as the world's first computer programmer.

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  21. I learned about Brighton and the Prince Regent's Pavilion.

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  22. I love history, and I love romance novels, so I have picked up quite a few facts over the years. I appreciate the research that authors do. With the benefit of their research, you learn the customs, fashion, vocabulary, historical events and personalities, and just daily life. I have particularly enjoyed learning about the Christmas customs in different locations and time periods.

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  23. From reading historical romances I learned that not much has changed from then to now except for mode of dress, manners, modern conveniences and divorce. There is still courtship with push/pull, give/take and dancing around issues like should we/shouldn't we. In Regency and other historical eras, folks appeared to work harder at making a marriage "stick." Basic things like common interests, staying away from over-indulgence of alcohol or gambling, or enjoying and training your children were much the same as today. Both then and now we humans have to work at romance and happiness. In romance novels there is almost always an HEA---and I read them for that. I read for entertainment and relaxation and a little fantasy makes me feel good and helps me sleep better at night--rather than reading/watching all the negative news in print and on TV. jdh2690@gmail.com

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  24. One thing I learn from the Historical romance books is how to talk and act. Myself I would never fit in not with my old Kentucky slang and bad manners LOL I do love reading them all. I do find it very interesting how they lived back then and all about the ranks of men etc. And the history too and the way they dress.
    Penney

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  25. I love reading historicals and read them quite often. Like Penney I wouldn't fit in because of my KY slang. Maybe I would fit in the ones from the deep south. Really if you think about it you pick up a lot of historical facts by reading them.

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  26. I love historical romances! I'd always wondered why characters had wedding breakfasts. Then I learned that marriages had to take place in the morning in a church unless one had gotten a special license (which was expensive but allowed the wedding to take place anywhere/anytime). I wasn't aware of how many wedding laws (rules) there were in England during that time.

    Marcy Shuler

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  27. Oh all these fascinating researches and findings! Having read Historical romances for a while now I am still in aww at the huge gap between the lower class and servants and the wealthy aristocrats and titled. Oh and at how those two speak! Especially when a lower class tries to play an aristocrat how hard it is or how easier it is for the aristocrat to play a lower servant (mostly the male). And of course how the females are always chaperoned or escorted places.... And wearing gloves, always wearing gloves.

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  28. I've learned all sorts of things, from early balloon ascents, to women trying to find a way to enter men's fields of study, such as medicine, chemistry, engineering, etc., as well as the differences in social stature and the way women were treated as property.

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  29. I learned guys understood romance better back then ;-)

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  30. The balls... the dresses are all terrific. But I don't think that I would want to live there at that time because of how women are treated....

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  31. Finding out about the fashion

    bn100candg at hotmail dot com

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  32. I write contemporary romance but I love reading historical romances. I'm drawn to the proprieties of society in that era. I love the history infused in the stories. I'd like to try to write a historical romance when I have the time to do the research that it requires.

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  33. I've learned, or rather had reinforced that moral values are continually changing throughout history... it is not a new situation. What was/is acceptable for one generation (and one social class) wasn't acceptable for all. Regardless of what our elders bemoan, there might be hope for the human race. ;-)

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  34. I have learned so many details of daily life in many different eras and social strata. The research the authors do and the effort they make to present an accurate representation of the time is appreciated. One thing I have found of interest since doing a history research project in college is the influence and position of the church in society. It has changed over the years, at times being more political than religious. There is always so much of interest and to learn.

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  35. I have learned about the different titles the aristocracy, I love how the authors describe the ball gowns, their different forms of etiquette and that you sat at the dinner table based on your rank, what French Letters were, there was always a happy ending for the hero and heroine and guys were very romantic in that era. I also learn a bit more of history as the authors do their research on a specific era.
    -Kristine R

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  36. As a history buff, I enjoy the nuggats of things not covered in textbooks...

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  37. Learned more than I thought about the Regency and their slang- still love the term "foxed". Learned enough to win a contest at a RT convention!

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  38. Since I never had a class in European history in school I've gotten most of my information from movies and books, and since I'm a big reader of historical romance I really appreciate the effort the authors put into research. I've learned about the oppression of the Scots and their Kings and leaders; I've learned about the Napoleaonic Wars; plus the social aspects of the times. I love it when the authors include real people as supporting characters - then I look for more information (Wikepedia is great as a starting point for that).
    sallans d at yahoo dot com

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  39. Can't come up with interesting tidbits... What I learned personally & remember most is that I am incredibly fortunate to have been born in the modern world. History revealed to me that a woman from a "poor" family like mine, would never have had the comfortable life I enjoy today. I know that economising and being carefull with things was always important growing up. It still is & I have never known wealth or luxury, but how immensly rich I feel. To have always been fed, clothed, housed, educated, cared for & loved. Showered with mom's handmade toys, opportunities, kindness and encouragement. Perhaps even better : I have rights and I have the freedom to make my own choices!

    Never have I traveled, never a glass of champagne. Didn't dance at balls in real life... Off course I daydream and think it must be grand, but through the romance novels I love, in a way I have come to understand that I have been really lucky in life! Something I need to appreaciate a little more. All in all a great and valueable lesson :D

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